About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
exaggerated. that's what's talked about any ideas. we are creatures who grew up in the savanna or environments where we were always subject to threat. so we're looking at that thing is going to hurt us, but we are no longer in those environments. we are in a complex economy, that really relies on organizations to provide basic necessities. so we have to update our thinking in a longer-term, focus on stories that represent trends and not exaggerate noise and we have to get away from here. so fear. a role in the development of human societies in the early stages is encoded in our dna. but to evolve to the complex modern environment we live in, we have to update the most basic aspects. so that's what your question speaks to. >> is a fearful venture capitalists? >> you know, the opposite of that, i may say well, venture capitalists has to be inherently optimistic because why would you invest in some thing where there's uncertain returns and so forth. telling a story about the coming prosperity is the story easily characterized. this is an optimist the beard i really don't see it that way. from my
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
at just the work environment where do you look at the home environment. a lot of habits that you have a development for home, you want people to practice safe computing wherever they are. whether or not it is their device from your device, or whatever kind of device. so i think that to sympathize with the public to the challenges and in a way that we did keep america beautiful, keep america safe, i think that we really need to do that. the second point -- i have three of them. the second point is that the sky is falling ocean is just hurting us. because people say yeah, right. but i think that we need to not communicate the sky is falling in the sky is just not going to fall. a lot of people compare now to what we did and there was a certain amount of sky is falling with y2k. the sky didn't fall. nothing fell out the sky. yet we felt we spent a lot of time and resources. last one i want to make is that it is difficult to share information when we have two political fortunes to classify. it is something that i need to know or communicate. i can't communicate what you guys right now. bu
. it is people like me are getting resumes every day in this difficult economic environment. from high class standing people. 800 sats, they are looking for jobs. what you have to do is find a hook on your resume and show a high sense of community service. when i interview people, basically, the desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am introducing a legend. you know, the legends do something different. you know, these are some of the characteristics. you can get help from the university. if numbers don't speak to you, in other words, ben graham wrote a book called the intelligent investor in 1954. in the bookie prophesies that analysts evaluate management twice in the process. once through the numbers. when you look at a company, the company is growing and the return investment is widespread and profit margins and whatever -- the return to capital and whatever -- those are resulting from the efforts imagine. so you want to look at the financials. also, you want to look at the face-to-face and understand the business properly. if you don't like working with numbers
environment for businesses or hospitals to grow so that could be more jobs? maffei: there's no question tax reform would be very, very important and if you think we need to lower rates but get rid of a lot of loopholes, particularly corporate loopholes, the ones that ship jobs overseas. cease to exist. ann marie buerkle is voted to continue. she's voted to continue to big tax breaks for oil companies. that's very important. i do think there's changes that need to be made in the affordable care act. i'm opposed to the device attacks. i've worked with well challenged not to in first place. i do think we need to make those changes but we will never making changes if we're not willing to compromise. >> moderator: would repealing affordable care act affect jobs in any way, it positively? the you see it affecting it in a negative way? buerkle: absolutely. this country needs health care reform. transom but you are saying he will repeal it? buerkle: i will repeal it and put in something that will be bipartisan. this is something the democrats sat down shutdown stroke of the of the american people.
this kind of seemingly open economy into vick victims -- victims, creating an environment where it's difficult to move up and young lebanese men and women leave the country to find jobs elsewhere whether it's in the gulf, europe, or the united states, and you see them in various places although the country's pretty small soçv' lebanese, the lebanese economy actually provided syria with a gate to the world in the 1980s, and that gate was a two-way gate so you will get the products that were not actually sold in the syria market officially through lebanon in the 1980s and provide goods to scrux later of the population, and the upper lay eric and then in the 1990s when the trades were more open, lebanon continued to be one of the ways that -- through which this took place, but in the 80s, lebanon and turkey were the two places where the illegal trades and smuggling allowed the black market to thrive and created a process of accumulation that literally created new stratas, now groups that created an interest in the stability of the regime. hence, when we talk about the syria regime, a
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
environment and let's see if we can move outside the building space into the district space so to speak. are these competing visions or they complementary and can we imagine with all this doubling up of tech expertise here that we can begin to move some of the coproduce solutions quicker? >> echo production in this case is possible when and if something's happened. so dte in the city and key institutions like worsening in the university have to get together and say we want transparent the run energy consumption are building. was it going to take to have a dashboard that you and i can access on your smartphone or kids can access in their schoolrooms are parents and home double tell them which of the schools of the city school district are cleaner and greener and smarter than others. something that would require collaboration, that would have been utility to share the data. a lot of cities are now doing this to really change the game because now i have access to knowledge that will then tell me which school is least efficient and i'm going to focus on why that's inefficient. is it not whe
capital needs, economic needs and needs for support in its environment, its region for a very long time. that has been the point of some of the things that are not to do with nato and not to do with me that have been going on over this year. so there has been an istanbul process in which regional countries got together, it was followed up be a kabul conference this summer, a series of regional confidence-building measures. those are now going with support from the international community. foreign secretary, for instance, was in kabul in the summer for the second of those conferences and promised support to that process where we can. there is the international aid picture, 4.1 billion promised to the ansf or pledged to the ansf up to 2017. there is also a further 16 billion, roughly the same amount per year, on civil development aid up til then. so there are a lot of other actors. i'm not going to speak on their behalf. it's not my job, and i could mislead you, but what i will say is that what is done by isaf and what is done by our armed forces are a smaller part of that longer-term pic
people like me are getting resumÉs in every day in this difficult economic environment fromfy -- from phi betas, and they're looking for a job. what you've got to do is find a hook on your resumÉ, and to the extent that you show a high sense of community involvement on top of good grades, that may be a way of distinguishing yourself from the rest. now, also, you want to go into a field that you have an aptitude for. as i said, you're not going to you can seed at something -- succeed at something unless you have an aptitude. so i thought i'd put together a list of things i look for when i interview people. basically, a desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am, the introducer says legend, and i keep saying a legend does not have an alarm clock that goes off at 5:50 in the morning to drive to jerseyty to be in his office at 6:45 every morning and go out every night of the week and try to figure out ways of beating the market. you know, that's, legends do something different. but, you know, these are some of the characteristics i look for. this, by the way, slide
and youtube. tweets on twitter. people go on the site and cares about environment the syria club might be featured. they pay for advertising that way. >> and that is enough to keep it -- how big is that? >> 150 staff around the world. >> wow. 20 million members. >> that's a lot of . >> yeah. toll it's about the massive kale. scale the number of people -- internet and that's amazings the capacity moral historical change. because of the facility and the rapid expansion because that have we have more members able to generate more revenue. >> we were talking about this last night on the panel. reheading toward if we have not passed a billion spent on television advertising. most going to nine states and 6 percent of the population. you're at the point it would been cheaper to buy every undecided voter a television at this point. hi i'm romney here with a plasma for you. i'm interested in your thought you mentioned politician and talking about congress in responding what about the way that -- you do you think the balance of the way we communicate in the race for president along with the sup
some major advancement that would be great for the environment. obviously, the youth vote is very critical. it is also very unusual that people care so much. [inaudible] so you are lucky and blessed to be listening to and to be part of this election. >> tim? >> though, i wanted people to step up a little bit. we talked about fiscally conservative people, and i would like to see some socially liberal liberals. we didn't get into the juggler or civil liberties were a bunch of other things. and i would like to see something from the left. as far as i can see, we have gone butkus on all those issues. every couple of years, there is a big debate that are held in some false. a connection between libertarians and conservatives, is coming to an end? my friend, jonah goldberg, says it has a pretty good idea -- libertarians are useful because they ask the question should the government be doing the thing we are talking about. there are some things that libertarians can learn from conservatives. one of the roots of conservatism -- after eight years of bush in four years of obama, i'm not sur
people think is the changing media environment. you mentioned we have not had prosecutions of reporters are media organizations, but i am wondering if your thoughts, and the challenges posed by the changing media landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints t
the environment we live in i don't know how to do that. for me this was a journey, once the cameras left was really funny. i thought i was going to lose my authority. i was afraid i would lose my authority once i didn't have cameras but once they were gone it was so liberating it was -- second semester was much better than the first semester. everybody is much more comfortable. i said -- -- writing some teacher jokes. some of the terms, organizers, collaborative teaching, modeling and somebody told me i needed a diagram. i heard that and made a doctor's appointment. sorry. the second part of this journey was writing the book. almost as hard as teaching. i wrote a cookbook with my son. i like to call it a memoir cookbook because my son was born when i was 19. he got to grow up with my uncles and grandparents and he and i wrote this book and wrote stories about the uncles and aunts and that is very nice and it is called don't fill up on the antipasto. we picked up stories to the recipes. this was like writing a book and not fully that but it is the same kind of responsibility that the teac
had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as the new domain of war and yet, we realized that maybe one in 1000 people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. so what we are trying to do in the zero day series is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand, and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> host: mr. o'harrow if you look at cyberspace in the united states right now, how would you describe security overall? let's just describe maybe break-ins in the neighborhood. >> guest: in the spirit of explanatory mission we have to can't really talk about cyberspace and the united states. a computer user in washington d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder-to-shoulder with a computer worker in beijing or in moscow. there there is literally milliseconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i woul
>> the environment of people and machines and networks as new domain of war, and yet we realize that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and the depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we're trying to do in the zero days series is to take pieces of itand elain theundamentals and the platonic ia is that everybody from my mom and dad t congress, um, and peop around the country can undstand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways for us to defend cyberspace better. >> hos wel if look at cyberace the united states rinow, how wouldou debe surityverall? much as we would deribe, maybe, crime or break-ins in a neighborhood? >> guest: well in the spirit of the explanatory mission we have, you can't really talk about cyberspace in the united states. a computer user in washington, d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder to shoulder with a computer user in beijing or in moscow. there's literally no seconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i'd point that out. as for the sec
of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the ne
billion in tort costs and create almost 300,000 jobs simply by improving the legal environment. that makes sense to me, and we can go through all of those numbers, but i would rather put my thoughts to the issue, then, of small businesses. we'll never have a sustainable recovery if we don't get a recovery in small business. look, you can go to a big pharmaceutical company or a big oil company, and you can have a great big lawsuit, and they're going to survive while it's going to be difficult and expensive, but you go after a small company, and they don't survive. it is fundamentally important to us not only to see the -- what happens in a state as to what's going to happen to big companies, what is going to happen to big job growth, but to understand that small guys work in an interdependent way with large companies, but many, many jobs come from there, and we have to always keep in our mind what's happening with small companies. now, one of my new things, mayor, you got to get on to this deal in your talks, is every time we have a merger in acquisition in this country -- i've just been th
to request information, to raise issues. it's really a very different kind of oversight environment that i think will serve the university very well. >> many of the pitfalls of the previous administration and board of trustees at the time were due to poor communications and accountability between the office the president and leaders of the board. how have the free recommendations and lessons learned improved that community cation, and what processes have been instilled to ensure both groups of leaders are fully aware of what each is doing? >> i think i addressed african -- i think i addressed much of that in my last response, but it has been a year of much more frequent meetings, much enhappensed interactions. the board is fully aware and very well briefed of any major issues that are taking place at the university, and i would also say that one of the objectives in my administration has been to create more interaction among my senior leadership team so that whenever any issues come before the university, that come around our table, we're discussing them in the broad group of about 18 memb
or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the record this congress which is the most ineffective congress we have had in our lifetime you voted on the ryan plan that takes medicare and turns it into a voucher program. he voted with congress over 200 times against our environment and over 28 times against obamacare. he has voted with them on issue after issue on every -- >> moderator: congressman's dold you voted against obamacare. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, we can agree there things are things that are very -- i think we want to call it by its name and frankly i don't want to offend somebody that might want to call it something else but the long and short of it is i think we have 21 new taxes on this.
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
that kind of individualized attention may be harder to get now in the environment that states are moving to. states really there in the degree to which the shift to automated method is being pushed versus just being offered as an additional opportunity for accessing the program. and so i think it's important to remember that not all low income population of access to the technology, to the internet or the same ability to be able to use it. we hear about prepaid cell phone plans being a problem for people when have to wait on hold for a long time or participate in an interview over the telephone. many states are closing local offices, which would mean that people live in remote areas have to drive farther if they do want to be able to see somebody and talk to things within. and are increased, or still have reports of uncommon benefits, lost paperwork, long wait times in person and on the telephone. and auto closure, which is sort of the way fancy way of saying that the state had the cheerios for people but didn't have the time to act on it so the computer automatically will close cases. and
of how are we going to survive this new environment. publishing is in a precarious position in some ways, and a lot of people think about that. we are constantly trying to change and adapt and sing on top of things. like adding e-books to our website. we are having a website in order we bring in new products all the time and more things that are nonbook items in the store that people really enjoy for gift giving. we definitely have to stay on top of things to make sure we are checking what the next place as we can be going. where are you going to browse? where you going to browse them, where you going to get ideas? well, i personally did not want amazon controlling everything. they are not the people. they are internet people. we want to making the decisions on what gets published and what gets out to the people. if you really want an independent bookstores, it might not >> finding something new by favorite author that he didn't know about. we value the people that work there. >> we continue our look at the literary culture of montpelier, vermont. we hear from the author michaeld coffin
environment. you have no power, you may have no phones. we all understand and sympathize. we want to make sure that you can return and return safely and that we are working swiftly to rebuild communities. now, you are going to ask me what does that have to do with cybersecurity? a couple of things. we know that cyber extends into every aspect of everyday life. but just think of this. as mentioned, the nation is under attack constantly on cyber. it is an area that i've seen grow in sophistication and in almost four years i've been secretary. the secretary panetta at the dod sounded the alarm, and i do as well. one of the possible areas of attack of course is a tax on the nation's control systems. the control systems that operate our utilities, water plants, pipelines, financial institutions. and if you think that a control system attack that takes down a utility even for a few hours is not serious, just look at what is happening now that mother nature has taken of those utilities. the cascading effect for immediate and serious and can be life-threatening. so, the urgency, the immediacy of the c
are we going to survive in this new environment, you know, publishing is in a procare yows position in some ways, and a lot of bookstores in procare yows positions. how will we survive that? we think about that all the time. there's no resting on your laurels, even if you're been here 40 years. we are constantly trying to change and adapt and stay on top of things. you know, like, adding e-books to the website and having a website that you can order any kind of books on, all something we work on all the time, you know, we're on facebook now, bringing in new products all the time. we have more things that are non-book items in the store that people really enjoy for gift giving that we pay careful attention too. we definitely have to stay on top of things to make sure we're checking what's the next place we should be going and not just assuming they will keep coming. it is very important to keep the bookstores because where are you going to browse if the bookstores close? there's not going to be, you know, box stores are going away to some extent, certainly for books. where will you b
way, the optimum environment on average in which to raise children speech you in america. other countries have, but perfectly viable of the models, like swedish couples, european progress of couples don't really get married, but they stick together. >> host: they actually don't. unmarried couples sit together on average for a less long amount of time. >> guest: in america because we like marriage. we have what is called a marriage go around. it's not as simple as your saying. the most interesting but some marriages a culture that is obsessed with marriage is also always in the marriage. we have a very turnaround culture if you're not rich where stability of unions in america is related to the marriage, but in other countries it's not really. >> host: where does all this leave children? >> guest: you know, but not -- it depends which children. the children of the elites now, which is a see lots defined as college-educated, i think, in a pretty good time. we are in a time in which children pay a lot. some might say an excessive amount of attention. we are in a hyper parenting mome
and we are working on policies that will help his government create an environment for small business. i come from a long line of small business. i phoned a owned a small business and then whopper for many years. it doesn't necessarily translate into good government. i think what we need are people and small businesses to grow and prosper and to help families get through this economy. the disparity of income is the biggest problem and what my two major opponents offers more of the same. >> moderator: i want to throw some questions out. >> i'm not small-business owner. i've never said i was that i was self-employed, and a freelance writer. of course, if you are political, like i am when you run for senate, you are suddenly no longer employed in that way. not only have i not created jobs, have actually cost myself a job for office. so one question, i don't have a very good record. >> i will follow up with mr. gone. dalton: we have looked at government services being separate. the u.s. senate is a job. everyone talks about jobs. in the abstract, i will do this amount. the secretary talked a
of the plant. the environment is it like beckham is to be burned on the grove. >> and so this is obviously a big album for progressives because sites that production may be help global warming but genetic modification, but they're so ideologically -- acts of eco-terrorism. energy production. as you know, the far left seems to be opposed to any and all forms of energy. in the upper left corner after fukushima a few people protesting nuclear power. angela merkel, who i respect us in the iron chancellor of germany, she decided because of the process to shut down nuclear power. now she's a nuclear physicist, so she really should know better. [inaudible] or title with a nylon time. she came into environmentalist pressure and shut down nuclear power plants. in the upper right you're fracturing causes cancer, which is not true and some guy dressed as a weasel dancing. not sure what that's about. and the lower left corner, you have no dams. they don't want hydroelectric power. this is in the region of patagonia in the argentinian, trillion border comes to their post-hydroelectric power on the righ
in mexico. i was able to get out, a very dangerous time, very dangerous environment. >> chris, you start running drugs for a man named jack anders. can you describe for us that first experience when you were heading to wichita? >> i never did drugs so i don't understand the drug holder perce. the first drug i ran was 100,000. we negotiated the price. i got in the car and started driving and all i could think is what happens if my car breaks down or get a flat tire or in a wreck? i was freaking out over the fact the drug there in my car period. at that point dilutions of paranoia start sinking in a new see ghosts behind every tree and cops behind every bush and i thought i was going insane. >> you had a particularly ingenious disguise. >> there's a ski mountain north of el paso. i read this key reports and when i hit the border patrol checkpoint, the border agent never questioned me before. when i was running drugs i was younger and better looking because i had hair. you would ever guess i was involved in any sort of criminal enterprise. and i went about my way. was the first time he aske
. with the environment here i will focus on the buffer zone. is that israel's intentions are most visible and cause is the most striking. >> the important part of the economy severely degraded. it is destroyed. key factor is the book that some that has been unilaterally imposed since busta art and then gradually will widen in at the time. they are partially index of stations sensible. identified by the wynn. consequently the buffer zone with its 14% of the land area to encompass between 48 and 55% of the total land including many water rhodes. 95% is arable. those restrictions is an annual loss of $83,000 of potential produce. the extended buffers down down -- zone 20 nautical miles or reduce debt three where the waters are fall with a daily switch flow in excess of 23 million gallons. actually the arable land and maritime laws supersede but approximately 7800 said the agricultural land inside and outside of the buffer zone interest trees, crops come under serious, greenhouses. this has translated into the fact one-third of but one is water brown have the time to get into the history but i will hig
topic of the environment, we will start with mr. mcdowell. will you support the keystone pipeline? mcdowell: the keystone pipeline is important. a need to make sure that it gets completed. it has to be done in a responsible manner and we have to give that pipeline that doesn't engage our most critical resources like water, and that is what we need to do, we need to get it done and we need to do it in a responsible manner. we have so many great natural resources here in northern washington. we have so much abundance of iron ore we have reports and water resources have to be protected. we have to make sure that it is done in a responsible manner. we have to make sure that we have the power to sufficiently power our economy. because a strong economy needs an affordable and reliable policy. >> moderator: thank you. doctor benishek? benishek: absolutely support that. in washington, we talk about all of the above energy plans. they block the keystone pipeline. they block oil and gas showing on federal land. and we need all of the above energy plans that include wind and solar and gas an
was hoping we could talk a little bit about changing media environment. you mentioned that we haven't had a prosecution of reporter or media organization. but i'm wondering if you're faults are any challenges posed by the landscape, the emergency of the new organizations and technologies that might be as responsible and willing to listen to government requests. are we looking at the new era because of the kind of fragmentation of the media environment and what kind of challenges might there be for the classification regime and prosecutors going forward? >> you mean is aera journalist? >> it complicates the issue let's put it that way. it's not of "the new york times" >> neil? >> they're worried about the article on the front page of the post that has was that information you were thinking about now. all of new types of journalists or media operate under the constraints of the traditional media do. i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others when the of clauson for the information they think they have that information to the government and say look, you make the case for
and the environment in natural resources division. he has held several other positions in the justice department including assistant to the solicitor general, associate deputy attorney general and acting assistant attorney general in the office of legal policy. he is a graduate of yale law school. please welcome roger clay. [applause] >> thank you very much for that nice introduction and for inviting me today. thank you to the cato institute and thank you to rick sander and stuart taylor for writing this wonderful book. i will he preys on them for this book, it is terrific, makes an extremely important contribution to the debate on these issues, unprecedented contribution in many ways. i have read the book and is very readable, has lots of charts and diagrams for those who like that sort of thing. very well written, everybody should buy multiple copies and give them to friends and family, people you know, people you don't know. it is a terrific book. and something about what terrific people the authors are. you got to be smart to write a really good book but you also have to be brave. particular
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
institute will team up to discuss the future of retirement in this daunting economic environment they will stick to the current crop of retiring baby boomers and give saving strategies for the younger generation for those golden years far ahead. this will be a new program this is thursday year the commonwealth club in san francisco. tuesday october 2nd former connecticut senator chris dodd will be here in his new role as the chairman and ceo of the motion picture association of america. he will address how last technology has moved entertainment content to the cloud it's created economic challenges to both the industry and government protecting the rights of the 2.2 million cremators and makers in every state especially in california. and then three days later, friday october 5th, massachusetts congressman barney frank will be here for a luncheon program. i should tell you chris dodd is a 6 p.m. program also at the club in san francisco. friday october 5th, barney frank will be here for a luncheon program on the of the commonwealth club can you see both dolph and frank in one wee
positions in both the civil rights division and the environment and natural resources division. he has held several other positions in the justice department including the assistant to the solicitor general, associate deputy attorney general, and acting assistant attorney general in the office of legal policy degette ki is a graduate of yale law school. please welcome roger. [applause] >> thank you very much for that nice introduction and for inviting me today. thank you to the cato institute and rick and stuart writing this wonderful book. i am going to begin by keeping praise on rick and stuart for this book to be it's terrific. it makes an extraordinary contribution to the debate on these issues. i think it's unprecedented my contribution in many ways. i've read the book, and it's very readable and it's got lots of charts and diagrams for those of you that like that sort of thing. and it's very well written. everybody should buy multiple copies. [laughter] give them to friends and family. people you know, people you don't know. it's a terrific book. and i shall also see something about w
there is certainly points of commonality, for example, clearing and the clearing requirement, the environment -- requirement that most be cleared through a central counter party that's certainly common common notions about margin which is obviously incredibly important to avoiding and containing risk has yet to be rules have yet to be finalized domestically or internationally. generally consensus on uncleared, there's a complete lack of parallelism in many of the most crucial rules. our definitions of instruments that come under title vii regulation swaps and security base the swaps differ in and sometimes and significant ways from those instruments that are covered under the european regime. in the united states, our title vii requires that market participants swap dealer, major swap participants and vairnlgty of host of other new players submit to a registration and oversight process. that's a coordinated and national process. what we're looking at across the atlantic, is that in large measure do market participates don't have any new registration obligation and entity like central clearing
environment it's also very difficult to see or to guarantee that various rebel groups will not turn their arms on each other. unfortunately, the situation in syria has already deteriorated to such a point that even if assad were to magically disappear tomorrow, that would not spell the end of the conflict or the problems in syria. there are significant issues now at play. significant sectarian tensions as well as ethnic tensions between kurds and arabs and so forth. the third argument is that if the u.s. arms or helps to arm these opponents, it will translate into greater u.s. influence over those who eventually run syria. again, history proves that that is not the case. so i, so let me, let me, with that, with my two minutes that i've now been told i have left, let me move and try to end on a positive note which is, essentially, my own sense is that the downside risks of a military option in syria are significant. i also think the fact that we have reached the point we have reached with the conflict which is to say such a significant escalation of horrific violence inside the country as well
in creating the overall environment, the actual act is pretty quickly attributed directly on the insurgents. >> general -- >> thank you. just a final remark by me on this issue. protecting the civilian population is an absolute principle of this operation. without that protection this operation, in my view, would not be viable. and i think that is the view of all my counterparts and afghans as well. >> [inaudible] >> general and dame mary, the north atlantic council decides the rules of engagement. does the north atlantic council direct that in those rules of engagement if there was a possibility of a civilian casualty, that engagement should not take place, or is it a judgment call given down to the respective commander at the level that it's required to be made? in other words, if there's a possibility of a is civilian being hurt -- of a civilian being hurt by, say, a drone strike, it doesn't go ahead, or is it a judgment call made at another level? >> no. >> we are not allowed to give details on rules of engagement. >> indeed, i won't. but what i can say, the political guidance always gi
going forward. secretary clinton's been an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's opinion hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding fur diplomacy -- for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids, our military and national security, and the rest of our government which is, essentially, on life support. and that's a very hard thing to sustain. and so one of the things i like about the state department but one of the things that's a challenge is that you've got to get by on cunning and gilens and strategy. because you don't have the programs, you don't have the resources that the other branches of the government has. so the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole with. but i wouldn't hold my breath. i think making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope will be a bipartisan effort, but it's going to be a challenge no m
productive, less tense environment in the region. then you take israel even to compare it to taiwan, that issue was bracketed between the two countries, between china and the united states. it was bracketed. you could similarly have something between the united states and iran over the us rail and palestinian issue. but i must come back to this other issue. this is in our strategic interest to come to terms with iran just like china. when mao was in charge, when nixon went to see mao, he had just presided over the killing of over three million chinese. they didn't just have a nuclear weapons program, they had tested nuclear weapons. the interest here is what is in the u.s. national interest. even there this is another critical challenge for the united states. as middle eastern populations become more empowered and have more of a say in each of their countries, they are not going to vote for, they are not going to support a secular, democratic u.s. model for their governance. they're not going to do it. they're not going to accept or lobby for a complete copy of the islamic republic
't see it on the nightly news to say we have to cover this war? one was the environment every time we tried to do a prime-time special meehan leonardo dicaprio interview president clinton and i was killed for it. we did the prime-time special he was the chairman of earth day i thought he would make an appearance be interviewed the president. that was the attempt. but we did more tears them coverage before 9/11. we did a prime-time special but the military said the biggest concern it is enacted of terrorism of. i wish we had done more. education is not covered in the depth that it should be. some of our difficult to do with television. >> host: how much pressure is there to do entertainment as news? lindsay lohan or the superficiality? to seem that journalism has gone down is there pressure what is the news? >> there was the disagreement with princess diana coverage after she died and peter said it was a terrible idea but then came around. it was a constant battle within myself and is a line it has moved the cronkite book those issues have been around even walter cronkite did things th
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)